The Highlo Pen Museum


The Parker 75

The Parker 75, introduced in 1964, was a revolutionary design, having a contoured grip and an adjustable nib that you could turn to suit your individual style of writing. It's production spanned four decades, sold throughout the world, and still looks modern today.
In the 1960s and 70s Parker made several Limited Editions of the 75. In 1965 came 'Spanish Treasure', a pen made from silver recovered from the treasure fleet of Philip V of Spain, which sank off the Bahamas in 1715. Ten years later came a special pewter 'American Bicentennial' pen, made with a relic from Independence Hall, Philadelphia built into the cap. Next was the 'RMS Queen Elizabeth' fashioned out of brass from the famous liner that sank in Honk Kong harbour.
By the time Parker discontinued the 75 in 1993, the range of finishes varied from 18ct gold to lunar material recovered by Apollo 15.
The Parker 75 succeeded the Parker 51 as  the preferred pen of statesmen, and Parker often custom-made models for historic events. In 1987 Presidents Reagan and Gorbachev signed the Intermediate Nuclear Forces Treaty in Washington with a pair of specially commissioned sterling silver 75s, followed in 1991 by the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty using sterling silver and 22ct gold plated pens crowned with sapphires.
For everything you will ever need to know about the Parker 75, visit the Parker 75 web site at www.parker75.com
 
I currently have the following Parker 75s for sale:
 

Ball Pens

  Apologies for some of the poor pictures here, but some of these finishes don't scan very well. 
Silver-plated Millerais

55

P75-15

Excellent condition.

Flighter De Luxe

55

P75-18

Excellent condition.

 
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26/07/09